September 2019, Vol. 246, No. 9

Features

Natural Gas-Burning Power Plant Operations Vary During Cold Weather

By Energy Information Administration (EIA) Power generation in New England and New York is largely dependent on natural gas, which accounts for more than half of the region’s electricity generating capacity.  About 58% of New England’s natural gas capacity has dual-fuel capability, meaning it can switch to other fuels such as petroleum-based fuels. Data from the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) continuous emissions monitoring system (CEMS) reveals how certain plants in New England and New York switch between fuels in certain situations. Weather can have a significant effect on both electricity and natural gas demand. During times when natu

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