June 2019, Vol. 246, No. 6

Features

Inspecting Pipelines Using Dual-Conventional Transducers

Today, there are millions of miles of pipeline all over the world, and many of these systems are old. Pipelines transport energy (crude oil, refined petroleum, natural gas and biofuels to name a few) and other fluids to various markets across vast distances. The integrity of the pipelines is of paramount concern to ensure the safety of people and the environment. Pipes can corrode internally, resulting in a loss of wall thickness. If the wall becomes too thin, the pipe can leak or even break. A pipe’s wall thickness can degrade for many reasons, including temperature, CO-2 and hydrogen sulfide content, flow velocity and surface conditions. Sometimes this corrosion is expected, based on what

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