May 2016, Vol. 243, No. 5

Features

The Changing Landscape of Gas Infrastructure in the U.S.

The U.S. gas infrastructure has undergone significant changes in the last decade. The oil story has been closely covered by the media both domestically and internationally. We are all aware that domestic U.S. oil production has risen so dramatically that its dependency on imports has fallen to the extent that it could affect foreign policy, but what of the gas surge which preceded it? What lingering effects will it have? This article looks at the last 15 years in five-year increments and examines the changes in the gas infrastructure over that period to understand what has happened and just how rapidly it has changed. 2000:  A New Era for the U.S. as Gas Ran Dry When the world was enterin

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