March 2016, Vol. 243, No. 3

Features

Once Wedded to Oil, Houston Economy Carries on Despite Bust

HOUSTON (AP) — Amanda Salazar watched for a year as colleagues at the Houston-based oil rig manufacturer where she worked lost jobs, victims of the latest oil bust. She realized it was time for a change before she too got a pink slip. So Salazar left her job as a software trainer with National Oilwell Varco for a similar position at a hospital. Even if the oil market turned around immediately, she reasoned, it might take 18 months before the industry picked up again. “And that’s a long time to be sitting at work wondering if you’re going to get laid off,” she said. For generations, anyone who lived in Houston long enough was sure to feel the pain of an oil bust.

Log in to view this article.

Not Yet A Subscriber? Here are Your Options.

1) Start a FREE TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION and gain access to all articles in the current issue of Pipeline & Gas Journal magazine.

2) SUBSCRIBE to Pipeline & Gas Journal magazine in print or digital format and gain ACCESS to the current issue as well as to 3 articles from the PGJ archives per month. $199 for an annual subscription*.

3) Start a FULL ACCESS PLAN SUBSCRIPTION and regain ACCESS to this article, the current issue, all past issues in the PGJ Archive, access to all special reports, special focus supplements and more. $1,395 for an annual subscription.  For information about group rates or multi-year terms, contact J'Nette Davis-Nichols at Jnette.Davis-Nichols@GulfEnergyInfo.com or +1 713.520.4426*.

 

 

*Access will be granted the next business day.

Related Articles

Comments

{{ error }}
{{ comment.comment.Name }} • {{ comment.timeAgo }}
{{ comment.comment.Text }}