November 2015, Vol. 242, No. 11

Features

Combating Noise in Gas Pipeline Transmission

Pipelines have been established for many years as the simplest and most economical way to transport high quantities of natural gas over long distances, moving gas from new shale fields and other production sources to LNG stations, local utilities, industrial plants and natural gas–fired electric power plants. Natural gas pipelines only consume an average of 2-3% of the gas’s potential energy to overcome frictional losses along the route, making them more cost-effective than the use of road or rail transport. Pressure differentials are used to “push” the gas through transmission pipeline. However, as pipelines get longer, it becomes necessary to increase the pressur

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