May 2015, Vol 242, No. 5

Features

Cybersecurity 2015: Connected Pipelines and Proliferation of Threats to Infrastructure

On Aug. 5, 2008, the 1,099-mile-long Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan (BTC) pipeline, which is frequently used by many of the world’s largest oil and gas companies to transport crude oil across Europe, exploded outside of Refahiye, Turkey. Shortly after the incident, the ethnic group, known in Western Asia as Kurdish separatists, claimed responsibility for the explosion. The Kurds declaration, however, had little legitimacy and was quickly exposed as nothing more than a poor attempt to garner attention and incite fear among those who they deem as adversaries. The Turkish government soon thereafter released what it identified as sufficient evidence to prove that the explosion was a result of an in

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